Cognitive Behavioural Therapy didn’t work for my friends; why should it work for me?

In response to a question that I have been asked on the Facebook group, here is a piece I have written on CBT (Cognitive Behavioural Therapy) and how it works, or may not work for you!

CBT, or Cognitive Behavioural Therapy is a kind of therapy that is popular within the NHS. The reason that it is so popular is that it is an evidence-based practice; meaning that there have been scientific studies which prove that the therapy works (Whitfield and Williams, 2003). That isn’t to say that Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) works for everyone, just that it works quite often! We are all incredibly individual- just as you and your friend have very different needs when it comes to relationships; so do we all have very different needs when it comes to therapy!

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy works by looking at how our thoughts affect our feelings, which affect our behaviours, which in turn, affect our physical feelings- it’s sometimes called the CBT donut, as all of these behaviours and emotions affect each other! An outside situation happens, which in turn, makes us think and feel an interaction- sometimes these are good, and sometimes these are bad. When the interactions are negative, this is where Cognitive Behavioural Therapy can work.


CBT can be very helpful for certain conditions; Panic Attacks, Anger, Depression, Phobia’s, OCD (Obsessive Compulsive Disorder), PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder), Sexual problems and Health problems. In simple terms, if your issue is quite specific, (for example a phobia of spiders) the more likely it is that CBT could help you. That is not to say that Cognitive Behavioural Therapy will work for you, if you have one of these issues!

During the Cognitive Behavioural Therapy sessions, you will set goals with the Therapist; specific goals, that you will work towards each week. The techniques that you learn to achieve your goals during your Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, can be utilised in other areas of your life, and are tools in your toolbox for dealing with issues as you go through life, and let’s be honest, we could all do with learning tips that might make the journey of life a little easier!

CBT tends to deal with the present, the here and now, which is where Cognitive Behavioural Therapy differs from other talking therapies. With CBT, we do not go in to the past and deal with issues you may have had since childhood; and for some issues, this is ok, as you only seek to change how you make sense of, and react to, certain situations.

However, for some people, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy is not enough- they need to go back into their past and to deal with the issues that they have experienced during their lives. Talking therapies are non-directive, and deal with support and empathy. Although your CBT Therapist may well be empathic and supportive, it is within the remit of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy to be directive- this means that the Therapist will give you advice, ideas and techniques as to how to help your issues. This, though, is very different from being told what to do- and I am sure you will agree, nobody likes being told what to do!

My practice is considered to be Integrative- this means that I utilise different types of therapeutic techniques. My main modality is to be Person-Centered; which, to you and me, just means that I am empathic, supportive and offer a non-judgemental listening ear, whilst we work together to get to a therapeutic ending. Sometimes, this does mean that I use Cognitive Behavioural Therapy; but I am not limited to just that. Perhaps a mix of therapies is what you’re after? After all, sometimes we just don’t know what the issues are, or that the issue is grounded in our experience from a long time ago. Either way, perhaps CBT may not be for you, but it could be worth a try!


Links to read:

NHS CBT (Cognitive Behavioural Therapy) Website

Royal College of Psychiatry Information on CBT Website CBT

Whitfield, G. and Williams, C. (2003) ‘The evidence base for cognitive–behavioural therapy in depression: delivery in busy clinical settings’, Advances in Psychiatric Treatment, vol. 9, no. 1, Jan, pp. 21-30.


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